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GI Bill®

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The Montgomery GI Bill® (Ch. 30)

 

How long after separation from service do I have to use my Montgomery GI Bill® benefits?

Typically, the MGIB benefits expire 10 years after discharge. However, if you are a veteran who is currently unemployed, and between the ages of 35-60, you may qualify for an additional year of MGIB benefits under the VOW to Hire Heroes Act. To determine eligibility, visit the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs or call 1-888-442-4551.

Is a veteran with a general discharge who elected the MGIB at time of enlistment eligible for MGIB?

To be eligible for the Montgomery Bill, you must have a discharge under honorable conditions. If you received a general discharge, that status would need to be changed in order to receive MGIB benefits. To request an upgrade to the character of discharge, contact your service’s Board for the Correction of Military Records (BCMR).

Can I use Hazlewood and Chapter 30 benefits at the same time?

Yes

My Active Duty Chapter 30 G.I. Bill benefits will be exhausted soon, but I still have two more semester’s of school until I graduate. Can I extend my benefits, or am I eligible for benefits under Chapter 33 - Post 9/11G.I. Bill after my Chapter 30 is exhausted?

To answer the first part of your question, no you cannot extend your Chapter 30 benefits. However, if you qualify for the Post 9/11 G.I. Bill (90-days of active duty, after September 10, 2001 for the minimum benefit, up to three years of active duty service for the full benefit), then you could be eligible for an additional 12 months of education benefits.  The way the VA’s Rule of 48 reads is, if you qualify for two G.I. Bills, your maximum combined benefit is up to 48 months.

To get the additional 12 months, completely exhaust your Chapter 30 benefits. Once exhausted, switch over to the Post 9/11 G.I. Bill. Those additional 12 months should give you what you need to finish up your schooling.

If your Chapter 30 benefits happen to run out during a semester, don’t worry, the VA will run your Chapter 30 Benefits to the end of the semester and then subtract the months you didn’t have from your 12 additional months of Post 9/11 G.I. Bill. While it sounds confusing, it really works well and from your perspective, it will be seamless

The Post-9/11 GI Bill® (Ch. 33)

What is a Certificate of Eligibility (COE)

 

A Certificate of Eligibility is an award letter from the VA stating your percentage of eligibility for GI Bill® benefits and the number of months and days of entitlement. You receive it in the mail after you have applied for benefits with the VA (via VA form 22-1990, 22-1990e, 22-5490). It is REQUIRED in order for us to process your benefits. We do NOT know that you are eligible for GI Bill® benefits unless you show us this eligibility letter.

How do I get a new Certificate of Eligibility (COE)?

If you have lost or otherwise need a replacement Certificate of Eligibility (COE) you should contact the VA either by phone (1-800-827-1000) or by via their "Submit A Question" function on their website.

  1.  You will need to create an account when prompted.
  2.  After you create an account, click on "Ask a Question"
  3. You can then submit a secure email asking for a replacement Certificate of Eligibility.
  4. You will receive a replacement COE via postal mail.

The only acceptable alternative to a COE that our office will accept (via the online certification request system) is the "Post 9/11 GI Bill® Enrollment Status" or "Montgomery GI Bill® (WAVE) Enrollment Verification" on eBenefits. The student may take a photo of their computer screen; they may take a screen-shot, print-screen, or snip-it; or they may "print to pdf"--whichever is easiest for the recipient, but you will need to show your percentage of eligibility and your remaining entitlement (months and days).

Is there an expiration of benefits for the Post-9/11 GI Bill®?

Yes. In most cases, service-members and veterans need to use the Post-9/11 GI Bill® within 15 years of discharge.

I retired from the military before 2009, am I or are my dependents eligible for the Post-9/11 GI Bill®?

Anyone who served at least 90 days on active duty after September 11, 2001, is eligible for Ch. 33. Those who served less than 36 months since 9/11/2001 will receive a reduced benefit. Those who retired prior to August 1, 2009, are not eligible to transfer benefits to their dependents. For information please visit the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs.

Can I transfer my Post-9/11 GI Bill® benefits to my spouse and children? 

Those who meet the time in service requirements and apply for transfer of benefits while still on active duty can transfer Post-9/11 GI Bill® benefits to spouses and dependents. However, dependents must be named and assigned at least 1% of the benefits available prior to discharge. Visit the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs for more information.

Can I use my Post-9/11 GI Bill® for summer courses?

Yes, participants in the Post-9/11 GI Bill® can use the benefit to take summer courses. 

I retired from the military before the Post-9/11 GI Bill® was available. Do I have access to the benefit, and if not, is anything available to me?

Ch. 33 benefits are dependent on the length of service post-September 11, 2001. Veterans with a service-connected disability may also qualify for Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment (Ch. 31). In addition, the VOW to Hire Heroes Act is available to unemployed veterans, ages 35 to 60. To learn more please visit the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs.

What is the difference between Tuition Assistance and the Post-9/11 GI Bill®?

Tuition Assistance (TA) is administered by the Department of Defense and has its own set of rules and eligibility. The Post-9/11 GI Bill® is administered by the Department of Veterans Affairs. As such, service-members using TA can continue their education under the Post-9/11 GI Bill® upon separation from the military.

Can I use my Post-9/11 GI Bill® to a get a pilot’s license and does the school need to be a FAA Part 141 School? Will books and other materials be paid for under my benefit?

Yes, the Post-9/11 GI Bill® covers certain types of flight training. To learn more visit the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs.

Can I use my Post-9/11 GI Bill® for other vocational training, such as a trade school or to get my CPA?

Yes, the Post-9/11 GI Bill® can be used for vocational training. For more information visit the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs.

Do I still get a housing stipend if I am attending correspondence school or taking online classes?

If you are taking all classes online you get up to 50% of your normal housing stipend. If you are taking correspondence courses, special rules apply. To learn more about correspondence schools under CH. 33 visit the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs.

Does ROTC count toward the Post-9/11 GI Bill®?

No. ROTC as well as Service Academy graduates must complete their initial active duty commitment before counting active duty toward Post-9/11 GI Bill® eligibility.

Can I use Hazlewood and Chapter 33 benefits at the same time?

You cannot use Hazlewood and Chapter 33 together, unless you are less than 100% eligible. In other words, Chapter 33 requires that you use those benefits before you use Hazlewood if you are 100% eligible for Chapter 33.

Am I eligible for benefits under Chapter 33 - Post 9/11G.I. Bill after my Chapter 30 is exhausted?

If you qualify for the Post 9/11 G.I. Bill (90-days of active duty, after September 10, 2001 for the minimum benefit, up to three years of active duty service for the full benefit), then you could be eligible for an additional 12 months of education benefits.  The way the VA’s Rule of 48 reads is, if you qualify for two G.I. Bills, your maximum combined benefit is up to 48 months.

To get the additional 12 months, completely exhaust your Chapter 30 benefits. Once exhausted, switch over to the Post 9/11 G.I. Bill. Those additional 12 months should give you what you need to finish up your schooling.

If your Chapter 30 benefits happen to run out during a semester, don’t worry, the VA will run your Chapter 30 Benefits to the end of the semester and then subtract the months you didn’t have from your 12 additional months of Post 9/11 G.I. Bill. While it sounds confusing, it really works well and from your perspective, it will be seamless

National Guard & Reserve

 

I am a member of the National Guard/Reserve, what type of days count toward Post-9/11 GI Bill® benefits?

Any time spent on Title 10 active duty, or under certain types of Title 32 orders, count toward eligible time for Post-9/11. Contact the VA for assistance determining what types of active duty qualify for Ch. 33 eligibility.

Where do I go to get a DD-2384 Notice of Basic Eligibility (NOBE)?

We cannot process your 1606 benefits without your NOBE. You can get your NOBE/DD-2384 from your command.

Can I use Hazlewood and Chapters 1606/1607 benefits at the same time?

Yes

 

Yellow Ribbon Program

Texas State does not participate in the Yellow Ribbon Program because tuition here is well below the state maximum.