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Hazlewood FAQs

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General FAQs

 

Who signs my Hazlewood application if the Veteran is deceased?

If veteran is deceased, the surviving spouse or child’s guardian, conservator, custodian, or other legally designated caretaker can sign on the veteran’s behalf for the transfer of Hazlewood hours (Legacy program). They will sign on the "Veteran's Designee's Signature" line for Legacy Certification and Consent.

The Veteran's signature is not required if the eligible veteran is totally disabled, service-related deceased, MIA, or KIA. This is because the recipient is applying for their own benefits, not a transfer of benefits.

Can I use Hazlewood and Chapter 33 benefits at the same time?

You cannot use Hazlewood and Chapters 31 or 33 together, unless you are less than 100% eligible (Ch 33). Chapters 31 and 33 both require that you use those benefits before you use Hazlewood (if you are 100% eligible).

What charges are covered?

There is no money changing hands with this benefit. The Hazlewood Act is an exemption from the payment of tuition and basic fees, which does not include property deposits or student services fees. Books, supplies, living expenses, property deposit, penalty fees, payment plan/emergency loan fees, and student services fees are not covered.

How will the Hazlewood credit hours attempted be tracked and recorded?

All students using the Hazlewood Act benefit can register themselves with the Hazlewood Online Database, allowing the Texas Veterans Commission, along with any institution the veteran may attend, access to the number of credit hours attempted in the current and previous years.

Can service in the Texas National Guard qualify an individual for Hazlewood Act benefits?

Individuals in the National Guard who served at least 181 days of active duty service (excluding training) and meets all other program requirements may qualify for Hazlewood Act benefits.

 

Types of Courses Covered

 

What types of courses does the Hazlewood Act cover?

Texas State University online courses, Undergraduate and Graduate Programs, and credits by examination are covered.

Does the Hazlewood Act cover teacher certification fees?

No, because the teacher certification fee is not an institutional fee.

Will Hazlewood Act benefits pay for correspondence, continuing education, study abroad, and extension classes?

Hazlewood Act benefits do not currently cover correspondence and extension study, or study abroad courses/programs.

If I’m concurrently enrolled in more than one college (in the same semester), can I use the Hazlewood Act at both schools?

Yes, just be sure that both universities process your benefits.

 

Financial Aid

 

Is financial need an eligibility requirement?

No. Hazlewood Act benefits are awarded regardless of financial need.

If I have defaulted on an education loan, am I eligible for an exemption?

Defaulting on a loan that is made or guaranteed by the state of Texas disqualifies you from receiving Hazlewood Act benefits. Currently, the state loans to which this provision applies are: Hinson-Hazlewood Stafford Loans, Hinson-Hazlewood Health Education Loans (HELP), Hinson-Hazlewood College Access Loans (CAL), uninsured Texas Opportunity Plan Loans (TOP) and the Texas B-On-Time Student Loan administered by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board.

If I received Hazlewood benefits and it is later discovered that I defaulted on an applicable loan, will I have to reimburse the school for the classes taken with the exemption?

Texas State University can require repayment of tuition and appropriate fees.

Can I receive Hazlewood benefits and GI Bill® benefits concurrently?

Yes. Be advised that you can only use Hazlewood and Post 9/11 GI Bill® concurrently only if you are less than 100% eligible for Post 9/11 benefits. Also, you must provide a copy of your certificate of eligibility from the VA indicating the benefit type and amount, the inclusive dates of payment, and the remaining entitlement at the end of the award period.

 

Texas Residency Concerns

 

My place of entry is in another state, but I was a Texas resident at the time of entry; do I qualify for Hazlewood benefits?

Yes. In order to be eligible to receive a Hazlewood Act Exemption, a veteran must demonstrate that they were a Texas resident at the time of entry into military service, entered the service in the State of Texas, or declared Texas as his or her home of record.


Veterans whose DD Form 214 does not indicate a Home of Record or Place of Entry into Active Duty as Texas will be required to provide a Texas high school transcript indicating their graduation within one year of their enlistment. If the entry date is more than one year after high school graduation, the Veteran will be required to provide one of the following: lease or mortgage documentation, pay stubs, or W2 to verify Texas residency in accordance with Subchapter B, Texas Education Code § 54.
 

Does an individual have to be a U.S. citizen when he/she enters service in order to receive Hazlewood Act benefits?

No. U.S. citizenship is no longer a requirement. However, the veteran must meet one of the time of entry requirements.

 

If I am from another state and re-enlist after establishing residency in Texas, am I eligible for Hazlewood Act benefits?

Yes, but only if you were out of the military and living in Texas long enough to establish Texas residency (12 months), entered the service in the State of Texas, or declared Texas as your home of record. Note that time stationed here in Texas does NOT count toward the establishment of residence.

 

Veterans whose DD Form 214 does not indicate a Home of Record or Place of Entry into Active Duty as Texas will be required to provide a Texas high school transcript indicating their graduation within one year of their enlistment. If the entry date is more than one year after high school graduation, the Veteran will be required to provide one of the following: lease or mortgage documentation, pay stubs, or W2 to verify Texas residency in accordance with Subchapter B, Texas Education Code § 54.

 

Does the dependent of a service member using Hazlewood benefits have to be a Texas resident?

Yes, the dependent must be classified by their institution as Texas residents for the term they apply for the Hazlewood Act. Check out the eligibility requirements here

 

DD214 Issues

 

2014-01 Guidance on Determining Qualifying Service on DD Form 214

 

Does a veteran have to provide his/her DD214 to qualify?

Yes. The veteran must provide a DD214 or equivalent documentation (if service is prior to 1950) to prove his/her eligibility.

I can't find my DD214. Where can I get a new copy?

The fastest way to obtain a copy of your DD214 is to submit your request online via the National Archives, or by calling: 314‐801‐0800 or by email at: MPR.center@nara.gov

What is acceptable discharge/separation language?

ONLY discharges characterized as "honorable" or "general, under honorable conditions" are legally acceptable for qualifying for the Hazlewood Act exemption. For information, contact the Texas Veterans Commission.

Does my DD214 have to show Texas as my Home of Record or my Place of Entry?

Veterans whose DD Form 214 does not indicate a Home of Record or Place of Entry into Active Duty as Texas will be required to provide a Texas high school transcript indicating their graduation within one year of their enlistment. If the entry date is more than one year after high school graduation, the Veteran will be required to provide one of the following: lease or mortgage documentation, pay stubs, or W2 to verify Texas residency in accordance with Subchapter B, Texas Education Code § 54.

Is the required amount of active service still 181 days? Are there any exceptions?

The requirement is "more than 180 days" of active military service, excluding training, for the veteran. There are exceptions: veterans who completed all of their duty prior to the conclusion of the Korean War. If the applicant is the dependent child of a veteran who died in the line of duty, the active duty time of the veteran may be fewer than 181 days.

If a veteran served less than 181 days of active duty service when he/she entered the service as a Texas resident, but had previously participated in active duty in the armed forces, could periods of service be combined to meet the 181-day requirement?

Yes. The law requires more than 180 days of active duty excluding training. It does not indicate this duty time has to fall in the period of service after entering as a Texas resident.

 

Hazlewood Act & Legacy Act for Dependents (Spouse/Child)

Can eligible veterans transfer unused hours to a child?

Yes. Under the LEGACY ACT, an eligible veteran may elect to waive his or her right to any unused Hazlewood hours for which he or she is eligible (up to the maximum 150 semester credit hours). The child designee must be the stepchild, biological child, adopted child; or claimed as a dependent on a federal income tax return filed for the preceding or current tax year. The child must be a resident of Texas, be 25 years or younger on the first day of the semester or term for which the exemption is claimed, and must be making satisfactory academic progress in a degree, certificate, or continuing education program in accordance with the financial aid satisfactory academic progress requirements.

Which dependents may qualify for Hazlewood Act benefits?

Children of service members who are killed in the line of duty, are missing in action, or who die as a result of injury or illness directly related to military service are eligible for HAZLEWOOD ACT benefits providing the child was a dependent of the Texas service member at the time he/she died. The student will need to provide official military documentation indicating he/she meets the requirement. Children of Texas service members who are totally disabled and permanently disabled or individually unemployable as a result of a service connected injury are also eligible for this benefit. The student will need to provide official documentation from the Department of Veterans Affairs indicating that the service member has a total and permanent disability rating or is individually unemployable.

2015-02 Supporting Documentation for Grandchildren and Other Children Using Hazlewood

Does the Hazlewood Act provide benefits to the spouses of Veterans?

Yes. Effective with tuition and fee payments for the fall 2009 term, HAZLEWOOD ACT eligibility has been expanded to spouses of members of the U.S. Armed Forces who were killed in action, died while in service, are missing in action, whose deaths are documented to be directly caused by illness or injury connected with service in the armed forces, or receive a total and permanent disability rating as a result of a disability or being individually unemployable. The student will need to provide proof that he/she was the legal spouse of the Veteran.

Does the dependent child of a service member using Hazlewood Act benefits have to be a Texas resident at the time he/she uses the benefit?

Yes. The dependent child must be classified by their institutions as residents of Texas for the term or semester for which they apply for the Hazlewood Act exemption.

Can the children or spouses of a member of the Texas National Guard use the Hazlewood benefit?

Maybe. The Hazlewood Act benefit is extended to the dependent children and spouses of Texas National Guard and Texas Air National Guard members killed in the line of duty since January 1, 1946, while serving the State of Texas or the United States or who are totally disabled according to the disability ratings of the Department of Veterans Affairs, regardless of whether the members are eligible to receive disability benefits from the department.